Halos banned from euro coin depicting St. Cyril and St. Methodius

The Commission of the Eurpean Union has demanded that Slovakia remove the halos from its new Euro coin commemorating the 1,150th anniversary of the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Moravia. A spokeswoman for the Bank of Slovakia explained their decision to comply with the European Comissions demands:

‘The European Commission and some member states have asked Slovakia to remove some symbols from the draft coin to comply with the principle of religious neutrality. We believe the final coin will be a dignified combination of a symbol of state and a symbol of Christianity,”

The European Commission defended its insistence that Slovakia remove the halos from  Cyril and Methodius:

“Under EU rules, when designing the national side of a euro coin, Member States are required to take into account that the coins will circulate throughout the whole eurozone, and in that context, proposed designs are shared in advance with other Member States so that they can provide any comments they deem appropriate.

The Commission acknowledged that some members states objected to the coin, adding that Slovakia submitted a slightly amended design, “which has now been approved by the [EU] Council of Ministers.”

Protect the Pope comment:  The European Commission’s demand that Slovakia remove the Christian symbol of sanctity that has been included on coins throughout Europe for thousands of years is yet another attack on our common Christian heritage. In the censored coin St. Cyril and St. Methodius have been reduced to the stature of  mundane historical figures, their eternal significance and role as intercessors and exemplars of sanctity removed from the public arena.  The secular reformation of Europe continues to impose its intolerant ideology under the guise of ‘religious neutrality’.

http://www.thejournal.ie/no-halo-on-slovakia-2-euro-coin-680616-Nov2012/

18 comments to Halos banned from euro coin depicting St. Cyril and St. Methodius

  • Rifleman819

    The next move if Turkey becomes a full member will be to have Saladin in full fig on the reverse of EU Coinage, won’t it?

    Times are hotting up.

  • ms Catholic state

    Can the Pope and all European Christians oppose this piece of EU bullying?! Is there any way we can voice our objections? It’s time we flexed our muscles a bit!

  • [...] Depicting St Cyril and St Methodius: The Commission of the European Union has demanded that Slovenia remove the halos from its new Euro coin commemorating the 1,150th anniversary of the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Moravia. A spokeswoman for the Bank of Slovenia explained their decision to comply with the European Comissions demands: [...]

  • Patrick Fahey

    We can vote UKIP at the next election which not only confounds the European Union but also the home grown politicians who have lost sight of God.

  • They still appear to be holding a cross. Surely the Commission won’t tolerate such an outrage for long?

  • Dave

    Apparently they got away with the double cross because it is a Slovenian national symbol. Thank goodness nobody pointed the Bible and the model church out to the Commission! We need to know which countries vetoed the halos, don’t we?

  • ms Catholic state

    It’s a pity the Slovenian government didn’t put down their foot and refuse. Let’s hope some gutsy former Communist bloc nation refuses to erase its Christian heritage for the utterly bland EU. That would be such fun.

    • Haslam

      They did put their foot down and the coins with the halo are being released.

      First Press release from the national Bank saying that they have decided to remove the halos….

      21. 11. 2012 | Press Release of the NBS

      In the light of recent reports in the Slovak media concerning a change in the design of the €2 commemorative coin marking the 1150th anniversary of the arrival of the mission of Constantine and Methodius to Great Moravia – due to be issued in May 2013 – Národná banka Slovenska today issues the following statement:

      1) Národná banka Slovenska (NBS) plans to issue the coin in accordance with its approved Issue Plan for Commemorative and Collector Coins for the years 2011 to 2015. The decision of NBS to include the coin in the Issue Plan was based on a proposal made by the Slovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic (Pamiatkový úrad SR).

      2) Considering the historical and social significance of the mission of Constantine and Methodius, NBS wanted to issue a coin that would bring this motif to the widest possible public in Slovakia and the rest of Europe. The NBS Bank Board therefore decided that the motif would be featured on a €2 commemorative coin, meaning that it would be in circulation throughout the euro area and not only in the Slovak Republic.
      NBS sees the issuance of this coin as an important way of bringing the historical significance of Constantine and Methodius to a wider European public.

      3) Since the coin is a euro commemorative coin, it is subject to the provision laid down in Article 1i of Council Regulation (EC) 975/98 as amended, according to which Member States are required to inform each other of the draft designs of national sides of euro circulation coins before the formal approval of those designs.
      The draft designs of commemorative coins must also be sent to the Council of the European Union (specifically to the Economic and Financial Affairs Council), to the European Commission, and to other Member States whose currency is the euro.
      The result of this process for the abovementioned €2 commemorative coin was that the European Commission and certain other Member States asked NBS to remove religious symbols from the draft design (specifically the saints’ halos and the crosses on their pallia). These changes were deemed necessary in order for the designs to comply with the principle of respect for religious diversity, as laid down in Article 22 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (which has the same legal force as the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union).

      4) The NBS Bank Board accepted these requests on the following grounds:

      not to accept the requests would jeopardise the principal objective of the coin, namely to increase awareness throughout the European Union of the mission of Saints Cyril and Methodius;
      in other recent cases, similar requests for the modification of coin designs (in order to respect religious diversity) have been accepted;
      the Vatican, too, has in the past accepted requests for the modification of its €2 commemorative coin designs and it did so when the legal regulation of such designs was less strict (the law governing the designs of national sides of euro circulation coins has been significantly stricter since July 2012).

      Národná banka Slovenska believes that the design finally approved for the €2 commemorative coin marking the arrival of the mission of Constantine and Methodius to Great Moravia represents a dignified joining of two symbols – the symbol of statehood and the symbol of Christianity. The Slovak double cross on three peaks and the bishop’s crozier held by Methodius are depicted as one and the same.

      Second Press Release saying that the decision to remove the halos HAS BEEN REVERSED (following an EU Back-down)…

      Statement from the 37th meeting of the Bank Board of Národná banka Slovenska

      23. 11. 2012 | Press Release of the NBS

      The 37th meeting of the Bank Board of Národná banka Slovenska was held today (23 November 2012) and was chaired by Jozef Makúch, the NBS Governor.

      The Bank Board approved the original draft design for the €2 commemorative coin marking the 1150th anniversary of the arrival of the mission of Constantine and Methodius to Great Moravia. In its previous decision, the Bank Board approved modifications to the draft design on the basis of a recommendation made by the European Commission on 20 August 2012. The reversal of that decision is based on a change in the Commission’s position on this issue, communicated on 22 November 2012 by the Representation of the European Commission in Slovakia.

      In approving the original draft design, the Bank Board duly noted the risk that a new notification process may pose to its principal objective in this matter, i.e. to issue a coin for circulation throughout the euro area which brings to a wider European public the historical significance of the mission of Constantine and Methodius.

      Petra Pauerová
      NBS Spokesperson

      National Bank of Slovakia
      Press and Editorial Section
      Imricha Karvasa 1, 813 25 Bratislava, Slovak Republic
      Tel.: +421-2-5787 2142, +421-2-5865 2142, +421-2-5787 2169, +421-2-5865 2169
      Internet: http://www.nbs.sk

  • Haslam

    Apparently the objections came from France (no surprise there) and Greece http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/48319/10/european_commission_denies_responsibility_in_euro_coin_design_spat.html.

    Why would Greece object? The two saints were born in Greece is that relevent? Does the Greek Church regard them as saints?

  • Nicolas Bellord

    I wonder why they have not objected to the Portuguese coins where the T in Portugal is a cross and the five “paos” on the Portuguese shield represent the wounds of Christ. Goodness me how stupid can the EU get? Or the Spanish coin with the Cathedral at Santiago depicted? And are not some such as the French coinage representative of the goddess of reason or somesuch neo-pagan drivel?

  • montechristo

    Dear Deacon Nick
    Please let me correct one BIG error published in this article: The country in question is not Slovenia, but Slovakia!please let’s not show the good people of Slovakia how geographically ignorant here in UK we are. Slovenia is in the Balkans, whereas Slovakia is in central Europe and once upon a time certainly was a part of the Great Moravia.

  • Spesalvi23

    Getting rather tired of this EU experience!

  • Fr Francis Coveney

    I wonder whether they would have tried to interfere with euros coined in the UK, if Tony Blair had committed the UK to the euro.

    The two pound coin still contains the title “Fid Def” – shortened from “Fidei Defensor”. Other smaller coins coins (with even less space) have “FD”.

    This title “Defender of the Faith” was (as every child was once taught at school) first given to Henry VIII by the Pope in recognition of Henry’s book “Assertio Septem Sacramentorum” which defended the sacramental nature of marriage and the supremacy of the Pope – as well as the seven sacraments.

    How ironic that Henry later objected when the Pope withrew the title – and got his servile Parliament to re-award him the title!

  • Col Mustard

    It’s a good job the EU doesn’t regulate the flags of the member states: seven of them incorporate the cross into their design, and remail fluttering outside the various parliamts that the hundreds of MEPs sit in occasionally.

    And even if the criterion of historical significance were to be cited in their defence, even the almighty Commissars of the EU cannot deny that to us little European citizens, surely?! Not only do the commissars want to engineer our society and culture today, they also want to whitewash history!

    Booo EU. I can’t stand ukip, but tghey have my vote in 2015!

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