BBC considers dropping the Bible from a flagship radio series due to complaints from secularists

BibleA source within the BBC has disclosed that senior managers are considering dropping the Bible from one of its longest running radio shows, Desert Island Discs, in response to complaints from secularists. The format of the show is that invited guests select eight favourite pieces of music they would want if they were marooned on a desert island. The guests must take the Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare on their imaginary journey, but can choose another book,and a luxury item.  Desert Island Discs is one of the national treasures of the BBC and is much loved by many of their listeners. But the National Secular Society, and other secularists, have demanded the exclusion of the Bible after its inclusion in the show for 70 years.

The Daily Telegraph reports:

‘Now, after years of complaints from listeners and even guests, senior producers have discussed dropping the bible from the show, a BBC source told the Independent. A BBC spokesperson denied that there are any plans or discussions about any change to the format of the much-loved show.’

The National Secular Society has long campaigned about the imposition of the Bible on those being castaway, and said it would welcome its removal from the show. They complained in 2010 when human rights lawyer Michael Mansfield said he would rather take the Bible of Vegetarian Cooking and was told by presenter Kirsty Young that he had no choice of “there would be letters”.

Terry Sanderson, president of the society, said: “We think it is rather sad that people are forced to take a bible with them if they don’t want to, it should be a matter of personal choice. “They should be able to create a paradise of their own choice, if you do not want to live in theocracy nobody should be forced to. “I know it is only a bit of fun, but it represents something which is quite ubiquitous at the BBC and that is this idea that everybody wants to learn about Jesus, some of us don’t.”  The fact that it was mandatory was “outdated” in an increasingly secular society, said Mr Sanderson.

However, some atheists have welcomed their mandatory reading, with Philip Pullman once telling the audience: “There are lots of good stories in the Bible.”

A BBC spokesman said: “There are no plans to remove the Bible from the format of the programme.”

Protect the Pope comment: It comes as no surprise that the BBC is considering dropping the Bible from one of its flagship radio shows, and they expect us to believe their reassurances to the contrary. The BBC is in the vanguard of institutions seeking to create a secular culture that denies the Christian foundations of the United Kingdom. Terry Sanderson, gay president of the National Secular Society, will only be satisfied when all signs  of Christianity are expunged from the public arena.  He and other secularists perpetuate the myth that the BBC is a bastion of Christianity, when this is obvious nonsense, because he seeks a cover of words to hide his true purpose, driving Christianity into the private sphere, hidden away behind the walls of its churches and homes. And the BBC listens to him because he has the golden ticket of being a homosexual, a secularist, and a vocal member of the liberal establishment, despite the fact that the National Secular Society has a minuscule membership compared to the faith communities of this county.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/bbc/10236025/Bible-could-be-castaway-from-Desert-Island-Discs-source-claims.html

 

14 comments to BBC considers dropping the Bible from a flagship radio series due to complaints from secularists

  • John Dare

    ‘Now, after years of complaints from listeners and even guests, senior producers have discussed dropping the bible from the show, a BBC source told the Independent. A BBC spokesperson denied that there are any plans or discussions about any change to the format of the much-loved show.’

    So the ultimate non-story?

  • Rifleman819

    Of course …had it been the theoretical removal of the Koran……..

  • Joseph Matthew

    Neither should they be forced to take Shakespeare.I am with Sanderson on this one.Sooner we realize the BBC is the bastion of secularism the better.
    I switch the radio off when thought for the day is given by Mr Longley or Ms Peppinster.So let’s get rid of that too.

    • Charles

      I am certainly not with Sanderson on this one. You are quite free to switch off the radio. That is what the off button is for if you do not want to listen. The secular society is dominated by the homosexuals Sanderson, Tatchell and Otton.

      The secular society want to remove God from everything even faith based organisations such as Scouts, Guides etc. They will be wanting to remove God from places of worship.

      The suppression of religion in the former communist countries almost destroyed them.

      Get a life, live and let live and get over it.

  • Rob

    An interesting one this.

    I suspect that when the programme started the Bible and Shakespear were made mandatory simply because it was thought that the programme would be boring and repetative if almost every guest chose one of those books as their favourite. By removing the ability to choose those books it meant that guests had to choose something else as their favour book.

    I think you can make a very good argument that the Bible was made compulsory 70 years ago in order to reduce the amount of time guests talk about their religion.

    If you got rid of the Bible, you would move to a situation where Christian guests who wanted to include it would have to specifically ask for it and explain their reasons for wanting it which would lead to prehaps more religion in the programme. You would also reduce oportunity for Guests who are not Christians to publically reject the Bible.

  • Karla

    The BBC better not cave, but what are the chances with the BBC?

  • Martin

    It’s no big deal. Rob makes a good point. Also, if you don’t like the BBC (and I wouldn’t be their biggest fan) then you don’t have to have a licence. Get rid of your TV and watch what you want whenever you want on t’internet. Nothing they can do about that.

  • Lynda

    I would have thought if the programme is much loved, rather more would want the Bible than not want it.

  • Sonja

    You need a tv licence to watch BBC on the Internet. Letter of the law ect.
    Maybe those against the motion should write to the BBC direct to protest.

  • Raymond

    Meanwhile on CBBC homosexual propaganda aimed at children is broadcast :

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b038lcxc/Marrying_Mum_and_Dad_Series_2_Spy/

    http://www.christian.org.uk/news/bbc-to-air-kids-show-on-gay-marriage/

    ‘Children organise the best wedding ever for their parents and step-parents. Callum, Chloe and Paula plan a spy-themed civil partnership for their two dads, making them skydive out of a plane at 4000m to the big day. Will it be Mission Accomplished?’

    I urge everyone to complain to the BBC about this odious attempt to normalise distorted sexuality and the attack on the family unit.

  • Sixupman

    The BBC used to have a programme “The End of the Day” with a prayer seeking protection from @The Devil’ through the night. Evensong used to be six days a week, which, then purely CofE, could be followed with our own missal due to a convergence of liturgies.

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